Fact to Consider when choosing Carpet

  • Most carpets are manufactured 3.66m wide and a small percentage are 4.00m wide. This is known as the broadloom width and as such the unit of measure in calculating carpet quantity is broadloom metres. There are rare examples of other width carpets.
  • All carpet has a pile direction or ‘nap’ and as such all carpet area’s which join together must run in the same direction.
  • The quantity of carpet required should always be calculated in broadloom metres and never in square metres. The calculations are based on how the broadloom width of a carpet fits to the required area’s and not simply a calculation of area.
  • All cut pile carpets are subject to shading. Pressure on the pile during use will cause the pile to lay in different directions, resulting in light refraction. This makes the carpet appear, from certain angles, lighter or darker. Shading is usually most predominant in a cut pile plush and very thick cut pile twist carpets. Shading is not an installation or manufacturing fault and will not affect the performance of a carpet.
  • ‘Watermarking’ is a phenomenon which can occur in a cut pile carpet as a result of permanent pile reversal. Watermarking appears like a watermark or wet patch in the carpet. This phenomenon is not an installation or manufacturing fault and is listed by all manufacturers as an exclusion from any warranties.
  • All carpet will appear lighter in a big piece on the floor. This should be considered when choosing from samples.
  • All carpet production runs will be of a different colour batch or dye lot. Manufacturing standards dictate that all dye lots must be with-in +/-5% of the master sample. The master sample is not the same as shop samples, however shop sampling is usually produced from dye lots which are very close to the master sample.
  • Loop pile carpets are produced in rows from continuous lengths of yarn. If a row is pulled, this will cause a ‘run’ in the carpet. Any loose ends should be napped off immediately with sharp scissors.
  • ‘Cross joins’ are a join in the carpet which run across the pile direction of the carpet. Cross joins are usually more visible than a ‘seam join’ which runs in the natural direction of pile rows. We do try to avoid cross joins, however this is not always possible or practical. We always endeavour to identify the most practical location to put joins in any area with aesthetics, traffic flow, lighting conditions & waste reduction in mind.
  • If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact us.